In 2016, Toddlers Have Shot More People in the U.S. Than Muslim Terrorists

When looking at child gun accident statistics in the United States, the Washington Post made a startling discovery: Twenty-three people have been shot by toddlers in the U.S. since the start of 2016. Eleven of those cased were fatal, with nine of them involving the toddler getting hold of a handgun and shooting him or herself.

The videos above and below look at those numbers head on, but here’s the twist that the website Mic.com recognized in those numbers: They explain that this was “exactly 23 more than have been shot by Muslim terrorists over the same period.”

The website is making a comparison to presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s rhetoric against Muslims entering the United States on the basis that they might sneak into the country and stage terrorist attacks against citizen. Author Zak Cheney-Rice notes:

Yet the threat posed by America’s gun-toting 3-and-unders hasn’t drawn nearly the same backlash as that against Muslims — begging the question of why our leaders are ignoring what, from a statistical standpoint, has proven the much bigger danger to our survival this year.

So far, no one has called for a “temporary ban” on babies leaving the hospitals in which they were born. No pundit or law enforcement official has advocated a more aggressive vetting process for toddlers passing through America’s airports, or OK’ed a multimillion-dollar police surveillance campaign to monitor places toddlers are known to frequent.

Here is a map showing where toddler shootings have taken place in the United States since 2015.

child gun accident statistics

While it’s difficult to find definitive reasons why it happens in some places more than others, the Post reports that Georgia and Missouri — where the largest number of toddler shootings have occurred since 2015 — have “pretty lax laws governing how guns are stored to keep them away from kids.”

For more on the debate about how politicians view gun violence versus the treatment of Muslim people in the country, visit Mic.com.

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