Church’s “Miracle Cure” for Autism, HIV, Cancer Is Just Bleach

Man drinks water from a bleach container. Image by puroticorico from Flickr

Youtube was recently in the hot seat again after complaints about videos selling a “Miracle Cure” to viewers. Referred to as “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS), the chemical mixture is being peddled as a cure-all for autism, HIV, cancer, and more.

The Genesis II Church of Health and Healing created MMS as a way to “bring health to the world.” They claim that the solution “kills most microorganisms through the process of oxidation,” according to the wiki page linked to the church’s website.

But the problem with MMS is that it’s nothing more than chlorine dioxide — an industrial bleach commonly used for stripping textiles, and that medical experts claim is dangerous if consumed.

Screengrab from Youtube video selling MMS.

MMS Is Dangerous

According to the FDA, two deaths have been reported in the United States as a direct result of consuming MMS. In addition, four people have had “life threatening” consequences, and one patient was labeled as “disabled” after drinking MMS.

Experts have found that chlorine dioxide damages digestive tissues and red blood cells, causing irreparable harm in children. Liver damage, dehydration, and kidney failure are also potential side effects.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there have been 16,521 cases of chlorine dioxide poisoning in the United States since 2012.

But despite what medical professionals, government agencies, and thorough science has to say about MMS, it is still being sold and consumed all over the world. (Canada and Ireland are the only countries that have outright banned the substance).

Screengrab from a MMS promotional video shows children being force-fed MMS.

MMS Distribution Around the World

An article from the publication Parentology describes how self-proclaimed pastor, Robert Baldwin, was recently under fire after he started nonprofit group Global Healing to distribute MMS to roughly 50,000 Ugandans as a treatment for AIDS, malaria, and cancer. He trained about 1,200 Ugandan clerics to mix and distribute MMS and videos show mothers giving the mixture to crying babies and children of all ages.

Baldwin spoke with Fiona O’Leary, an activist against the spread of MMS, who leaked the recording to the Guardian.

“We don’t want to draw any attention,” Baldwin said on the phone call. “When you draw attention to MMS you run the risk of getting in trouble with the government or drug companies. You have to do it low key. That’s why I set it up through the church.”

Screengrab from a MMS Facebook Group. The FB Messenger opens automatically to sell MMS to the user.

MMS Targets Vulnerable Families Through Social Media

The videos mentioned at the beginning of the article are usually targeting families that have a family member with some sort of disease that has no cure. Autism seems to be one of the more popular reasons a mother might buy MMS after videos promise to cure the condition.

According to Business Insider’s investigation on MMS, some parents have even admitted to forcing their autistic child to take a MMS enema.

These social media groups also give advice on how to avoid notice by social services. One moderator counsels parents to avoid discussing MMS with “therapists, nurses, and school officials” so that they can continue to use the product without legal consequence.

Parents with issues stemming from MMS use also go to these social media groups to ask for help when they notice rashes, lesions, vomiting, and discoloration. Often times the responses they get recommend upping the dosage or even bathing in the substance.

Image from Flickr

Be Informed, Don’t Drink Bleach

Youtube has taken down hundreds of MMS videos. Facebook has closed down MMS social media groups. MMS is banned in Canada and Ireland. It has been debunked by the scientific community and labeled as dangerous by the medical community. It does not cure autism, cancer, malaria or HIV.

There is no reason for anyone to drink this stuff. We hope that you’ll do your own research before you start giving a “miracle cure” like MMS to your family.