Teething Pain? Try These All-Natural, Drug-Free Remedies

There is little that tugs at your heart more than seeing your adorable little one deal with one of life’s first natural signs of growth and development. Teething usually starts between four and seven months, but can start as early as three months.

Don’t miss these natural teething remedies to help alleviate your baby’s pain.

Specialized Toys
Give her firm objects to chew on—a teething ring or unsweetened teething cracker.

If your baby wants to hold a teething ring, consider the silk and maple wood teethers from Sarah’s Silks. These teething toys are tested for baby’s safety and meet all of the requirements of the CPSIA toy manufacturers guidelines.

Vulli’s Sophie the Giraffe has become a classic in the U.S. and she’s been amusing babies for more than 50 years. She’s made of 100 percent natural rubber and she’s BPA and phthalate-free. Plus, the seven inch tall toy also squeaks when your baby squeezes her.

Baby Burpies
These handy cloths are a necessity at this time when your baby wants you to hold her and help soothe her pain. Traditionally, baby burpies are used for life’s little messes, but you can use the cloths to remedy teething pain, too. Simply dip a small area of the cloths in water and ring the excess liquid out. Chill the cloth in the refrigerator for about 15-30 minutes and give it to baby as something cool and comfortable for her to chew on. Frozen teething toys should not be used. Extreme cold can injure your baby’s mouth and cause more discomfort.

The stylish and functional line of Baby Burpies by SwaddleDesigns includes organic, muslin and cotton styles. In addition to soothing teething pain, these burpies make excellent lap pads and look great on mom’s shoulder when burping baby. And bibs are handy for babies that drool excessively while teething.

Teething Jewelry
You know how babies will grab for hair, necklaces and whatever else mom is wearing? Smart Mom Jewelry has launched a line of jewelry for moms to wear while babies are teething. These products don’t contain harmful chemicals—BPA, PVC, phthalates, lead or latex—and are soft enough for baby to chew on to relieve sore gums.

If you prefer beaded necklaces to pendant necklaces, check out ChewBeads. The adorable 100-percent silicone chunky necklaces and bracelets are perfect for moms. Just like Smart Mom Jewelry, these pieces are free of BPA, phthlates, and lead in addition to cadmium and metal. And the jewelry is dishwasher safe to boot.

Spoons
Yes, your ordinary kitchen utensils can be used to remedy teething pain. Once you sanitize your wooden cooking spoon in boiling water and let it cool, let your baby nibble on the wooden texture for relief from itchy gums. Wash all teething toys, spoons and cloths after use.

Good Old-Fashioned Massage
Sometimes there is nothing better than a massage from mom. The Mayo Clinic suggests using a clean finger to massage your baby’s gums with a gentle pressure to ease pain. Consider gently massaging her jaw and face to relax the muscles and help her relax.

When all else fails, use the age-old parent trick of distraction. Put your fussy baby into a warm bath with a plastic toy for her to nibble on and she may forget—for just a little while—that she was uncomfortable.

Keep the Usual Bedtime Routine
If your baby is irritable, follow the suggestions above, but keep the usual bedtime routine. Tucking baby into a favorite cozy wearable blanket or sleep sack for bedtime is a great way to help her be more comfortable at bedtime.

About the Author: Much like the laundry she does on a daily basis, Sara Frederick’s life has been one of many cycles. The financial cycle took her to Tokyo, Hong Kong, and New York. The wellness cycle got her trained in life coaching and positive psychology. The full time parenting cycle – really not a cycle, more a commitment, call it permanent press – brought her and her fabulous husband to Arizona. With two curious, energetic little girls now rounding out her family (and in school!), Sara has kicked off her latest incarnation as a writer. You can find her on the hiking trails, behind a camera or at a coffee shop, and can read her slowly emerging work on the website Mind-Body Rules.

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